Comfort zone

Quick Cooling Air Conditioning & Heating has over 20 years of experience in home heating and cooling repair. Our work is 100% guaranteed. And emergency service is always available 24/7.

 

We service all types of residential properties:

 

• Private Homes
• Townhome Developments
• Apartment Complexes
• Condominiums
• Dormitories

10 ways to cut your home heating bills.

Ask us about other money saving tips.

Winter is here, but it doesn’t have to bring huge heating bills with it. Take a tour of your home and check out these problem areas; fixing them could dramatically reduce how much you need to spend to keep your home warm.

1. Replace Worn Weatherstripping

Worn and torn weatherstripping around doors and windows creates drafts and lets in cold air. Seven to 12 percent of a home’s heat loss occurs around windows and doors, according to Black Hills Energy, and these leaks often prompt homeowners to turn up their furnace to keep comfy. Even if they don’t turn it up, they’re losing warm air, causing the furnace to work harder.

2. Adjust Door Thresholds

Some thresholds have four or five screws that let you adjust the height to eliminate a gap. Turn the screws counterclockwise to lift the threshold until daylight is mostly gone. A little light in the corners is okay, but don’t raise the threshold so high that it interferes with opening and closing the door. And the door shouldn’t drag on the threshold or it’ll wear out the weatherstripping.

3. Eliminate Drafts Around Electrical Boxes

Electrical boxes in your exterior walls are notoriously drafty because insulation isn’t always placed behind and around them correctly. To stop the leaks, remove the cover plates and fill small gaps around the boxes with acrylic latex caulk. For large gaps, use foam sealant. Then place a foam gasket over the outlet or switch and replace the cover plate. The gaskets cost about $1.10 for a two-pack.

4. Plug Holes in Exterior Walls

Pipes, gas lines, and electrical cables that enter your house often have gaps around them that have been haphazardly filled with some kind of caulk. But that caulk eventually cracks, peels, and falls off. These gaps let in outside air, plus they are ideal entry points for mice and insects.

Seal the gaps with expanding foam. For water pipes under the sink, unscrew and pull back the escutcheon ring, then caulk around the pipe.

5. Buy a Portable Heater (and Turn Down the Furnace)

Put a space heater in the place where your family gathers, like the living room, and turn down the furnace temperature. The rest of the house will be cooler but you’ll be warm, and you can save 3 percent on your heating costs for every degree below 70 F that you turn down the furnace, according to utility company Pepco. You’ll see those savings all winter long.

6. Cover Windows and Patio Doors with Plastic Film

windows account for 25 percent of heat loss in homes. Covering the windows and sliding patio doors with clear plastic film can reduce that loss. Just by using that plastic, you’re going to save about 14 percent on your heating bill. The transparent film is inexpensive; you can find it for about $6 for 62 x 84 inches at home centers. The film is simple to put on and won’t harm your trim, and if you put it on correctly you’ll barely notice it. In the spring, the film comes off easily.

7. Keep Warm Air from Escaping Up the Chimney

The downside to fireplaces is that when they’re not in use, your warm indoor air is escaping through chimney. Even when the chimney flue is closed, some warm air is probably still getting away. An easy solution is to block the airflow with an inflatable chimney balloon.

8. Insulate the Attic Access Door

Even in well-insulated attics, the access door may not be properly insulated, letting warm air escape through the attic hatch. And if the door is warped or something obstructs the opening, then the door won’t lie flat, allowing air to leak into the attic.To ensure that the door blocks airflow, use adhesive to attach fiberglass batt insulation to the attic side of the door.

9. Seal Air Leaks in Ductwork

Take a look at the duct work that’s accessible in your basement or attic. Look for places where the ducts may have pulled apart at seams and corners. According to Energy Star, the typical house with forced-air heating loses about 20 to 30 percent of the air that moves through the system to leaks, holes, and poorly connected ducts. Place a mastic sealant or metal tape over any leaks to seal them.

10. Tune up the Furnace and Gas Fireplace

There’s some up-front cost here, as you’ll need to pay a pro $100 or more to make the service call. But you’ll make it up in the long term with more efficient heating that lowers your bills while preserving the life of your furnace. You’ll probably also notice a larger flame that throws out more heat from your gas fireplace.

Don’t go another uncomfortable day without heating or cooling.
Call 908-298-1900 for a free estimate.